Advertisements
Wireless

Sprint To Launch Its Own Mobile Payments Service In 2011 To Challenge Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile Partnership

The company is working on a system with payment vendors and handset makers, and it plans to have it in place this year — before Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile‘s joint effort debuts.

Sprint was the odd man out when the other major wireless carriers — Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile — announced a partnership with Discover to support wireless payments on mobile devices last year. However, with that system possibly not ready until 2012, there may be an opening.

The company told Bloomberg that it is already working on a system with payment vendors and handset makers, and it plans to have it in place this year. While so-called near field communication (NFC) support would likely not be enough to attract customers to the brand itself, it certainly would give Sprint some bragging rights.

As of late there seems to be a mad rush to support mobile payments, with quite a bit of news in the space. Last month I told you about Google’s plans to begin testing a payment service in New York and San Francisco that would tie in with some type of coupon service: this was followed later by news that Microsoft was working with Verifone on its own solution. It seems like 2011 will be the breakout year for NFC.

Sprint’s idea is similar to Google’s, with its service is tied to a loyalty program aimed at giving incentives for using the mobile payment option. Charges would be processed through the user’s credit card statement, not their cellular phone bill.

As I’ve said in the past with NFC, whether this catches on will be dependent on how serious the phone manufacturers become in including the technology within new phones. ABI Research seems to believe that time is not too far off, with 35 million devices with NFC shipped in 2011, and double that forecasted for 2012. By 2014, some 340 million mobile users could potentially be using the technology, the firm believes.

Source: PC World

Advertisements

Discussion

6 thoughts on “Sprint To Launch Its Own Mobile Payments Service In 2011 To Challenge Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile Partnership

  1. I’ve had an Asus netbook for nearly two years and finally decided to equip it with a mobile broadband card. Since my need for such a device would be very casual (I have a 15Mbps cable modem connection with wifi router at home and 3G data on my phone) I was looking for a service that wouldn’t require some lengthy contract or a large investment up front. Virgin Mobile seemed to offer more economical plans ($20 for 300 MB) but the initial cost of their modem was significantly higher. ReadyMobile seemed to fit both requirements, especially with respect to start-up costs.

    First, I’ll talk briefly about the modem. It is a Sierra Compass 598 which runs on Sprint’s network. Setting up the device might require a little patience for some users. While the instruction sheet says you can plug the USB modem right in and install drivers from imbedded flash memory, I was unable to do so. That will require installing those files from an included CD-ROM. For those of you, like myself, who have a netbook with no optical drive present, you’ll need to copy the entire installation package, about 95 MB total, on to an SD card or USB flash drive. The driver software set-up process took longer than I expected, but eventually I was able to get everything running. To finalize the set-up and establish service, you have to call ReadyMobile and speak to a service rep. I was on hold for about 10 minutes, then spent another five minutes getting the account activated.

    The service itself seems to work just fine. I was able to play full-sized CNN news videos with very little buffering, though I could tell things didn’t run as smoothly when compared to my 15Mbps cable connection. That’s to be expected given the difference between an EVDO connection and a cable connection over wifi. As far as basic web browsing and email is concerned, the ReadyMobile handles both tasks quite effectively. Video sites such as YouTube are certainly watchable, but can chew quite a bit off your MB balance. I do not recommend this service if you’re planning on streaming tons of audio or video on a regular basis.

    I decided on the $25 plan for 250MB of data. That is about the only plan ReadyMobile offers that is cost-effective for light users. The $40/600MB plan is not a good value, and the $75/1GB plan is an absolute rip-off. If you will be using large amounts data over an extended period of time, Virgin Mobile broadband offers a much better value. However, if you’re somebody who needs a more temporary mobile broadband set-up for occasional usage, ReadyMobile is quite economical thanks to their lower-cost modem. It certainly is more suited to my needs than those expensive long-term contract plans offered by AT&T and Verizon.

    Posted by Mike Frerkes | April 12, 2011, 3:01 PM

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: Sprint To Launch Its Own Mobile Payments Service In 2011 To … | Telecom Operator News - April 6, 2011

  2. Pingback: Sprint To Launch Its Own Mobile Payments Service In 2011 To … | Telecom Carriers - April 6, 2011

  3. Pingback: Sprint To Launch Its Own Mobile Payments Service In 2011 To … | Telecom Carriers - April 6, 2011

  4. Pingback: Sprint To Launch Its Own Mobile Payments Service In 2011 To … | Telecom Operator News - April 6, 2011

  5. Pingback: Sprint To Launch Its Own Mobile Payments Service In 2011 To … | FIND BEST EDUCATION INFORMATION - April 6, 2011

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Advertisements

Older Pulses

Tweets

Stats

  • 43,632 hits
%d bloggers like this: